College of
Human
Medicine

MSU Grand Rapids Research Center

Grand Rapids Research Center Grand Rapids Research Center

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Grand Rapids Research Center Grand Rapids Research Center 

PROJECT UPDATE: May 9, 2016

Gifts of $15 million - $10 million from Richard and Helen DeVos and $5 million from Peter and Joan Secchia - will help construct the Michigan State University Grand Rapids Research Center. 

“Michigan State’s research enterprise is ushering in a whole new era of medical discovery and there is no place we’d rather see that happen than Grand Rapids,” said Rich DeVos. “Helen and I are proud to be a part of it.”

Peter Secchia notes that the addition of a Big Ten research facility in Grand Rapids creates a new level of opportunity that he believes will move the economic needle in West Michigan.

“MSU is a proud member of the Big Ten’s Committee on Institutional Cooperation, which is responsible for more than $10 billion in funded research — far more than the Ivy League’s $4.3 billion. The center will help to tap into this network on a deeper level and expand the medical research agenda. It will be a magnet to attract business in the life sciences and growth in biotechnology. Joan and I are really excited to be a part of it,” Secchia said.

Construction for the MSU Grand Rapids Research Center continues to be on time and on budget. The center is expected to open late 2017.

PROJECT UPDATE: November 19, 2015

Michigan State University College of Human Medicine celebrates a construction milestone  as the last construction beam was hoisted during a "topping off" ceremony. The Clark-Rockford construction crew and MSU researchers looked on as the beam was placed. The ceremony celebrated 25 weeks of construction safety.

PROJECT UPDATE: November 6, 2015

The Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) is awarding a state Transportation Economic Development Fund (TEDF) Category grant to the City of Grand Rapids and MDOT to address traffic flow issues along Medical Mile, near the MSU College of Human Medicine's Secchia Center on Michigan Street and the new MSU Grand Rapids Research Center, now under construction, east of Monroe Avenue in Grand Rapids. MSU will invest $88 million to build the new biomedical research facility and create 130 new jobs, in addition to retaining 80 current employees.

To accommodate the additional traffic generated by the new facility and to help alleviate existing traffic flow issues in the area, the City of Grand Rapids and MDOT will improve the freeway ramp configurations at Ionia and Ottawa avenues with I-196, and modify the US-131 Business Route (Division Avenue)/Newberry Street intersection. Other work includes reconstructing Michigan Street and Newberry Street.

"The City of Grand Rapids and MDOT have been excellent partners as we've moved through the planning and construction for the MSU Grand Rapids Research Center," said Vennie Gore, vice president for Auxiliary Enterprises, MSU. "We continue to be impressed with their commitment to the Medical Mile partners and the community in improving traffic flow throughout the corridor."

The total cost of the project is $6,171,966, including $1,570,154 in TEDF funds and an estimated $4,601,812 from the City of Grand Rapids and the MDOT Grand Region, pending final design approval.

PROJECT UPDATE: June 18, 2015

Ground was broken for the MSU Grand Rapids Research Center. The project delivery team includes a joint venture of Clark Construction Company, from Lansing, and Rockford Construction, from Grand Rapids, as construction manager; SmithGroupJJR, from Detroit, engineering and architect of record; and Ellenzweig, from Cambridge, Mass., laboratory planner and design architect.

PROJECT UPDATE: February 6, 2015

Michigan State University Board of Trustees authorizes Grand Rapids Biomedical Research Center

February 6, Michigan State University Board of Trustees authorized the MSU administration to expand MSU’s research capabilities in Grand Rapids by constructing a biomedical research facility on the site of the former Grand Rapids Press building.

  • The MSU Board of Trustees resolution for the project entitled “Grand Rapids – Real Estate and Research Facility Development” included a budget of $85.1 million for a new building on the northeast corner of Monroe Avenue and Michigan Street in downtown Grand Rapids. The combined budget, along with demolition of the Grand Rapids Press building approved by the MSU Board of Trustees in December 2014, is $88.1 million.

  • The project involves construction of an approximately 160,000 square foot, multi-story research building.

  • MSU will follow its traditional, university-financed model for delivery of the highly specialized biomedical research center as the assessment of the previous public-private partnership (P3) proposals did not yield a compelling, value-added benefit for the university to pursue a developer-financed delivery option.

  • The biomedical research building will occupy about half of the parcel, offering the university future opportunities to engage P3 developers in discussions about complementary projects that could further enhance MSU’s vision for medical education and commercialization of science.

  • The project delivery team includes a joint venture of Clark Construction Company, from Lansing, and Rockford Construction, from Grand Rapids as construction manager; SmithGroupJJR, from Detroit, engineering and architect of record; and Ellenzweig, from Cambridge, Mass., laboratory planner and design architect.

  • Demolition of the former Grand Rapids Press building is scheduled to begin in March 2015, with construction following.

  • The new MSU Grand Rapids Biomedical Research Center is planned to open late 2017.

WHY A NEW LABORATORY BUILDING?

The Grand Rapids Biomedical Research Building will allow the College of Human Medicine to advance its trajectory of NIH-funded research growth. In 2010, MSU College of Human Medicine opened the Secchia Center, a $90 million privately-funded facility constructed specifically for medical education and not designed to accommodate research laboratories. This was part of a long-range strategy that involved MSU partnering with Van Andel Institute and Grand Valley State University to lease laboratory space to support new NIH-funded researchers recruited to Grand Rapids. Through December 2014, the medical school has recruited 18 principal investigators (PIs) and their scientific teams to West Michigan and now fully occupies all desirable laboratory space available to MSU in Grand Rapids. Over the next two years, college anticipates recruiting another 6 to 9 additional PIs, for a total of 24 to 27 – plus their research teams.