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Pediatric Public Health Initiative News

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Geri Kelley MSU College of Human Medicine
Ilene Cantor Hurley Children's Hospital

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention awards $14.4M to fund Flint registry
MSU Today | August 1
Flint residents will soon be able to participate in a voluntary registry that will help connect them to programs designed to minimize the effects of lead on their health. Mona Hanna-Attisha, MD, will receive approximately $3.2 million this year to begin establishing a registry of residents who were exposed to lead-contaminated water from the Flint Water System during 2014-2015. The funds are the first installment of a four-year, $14.4 million grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to help build and maintain the Flint Lead Exposure Registry. Funding for the project was included in December 2016 legislation championed by Michigan's congressional leaders.
READ MORE | Related: New York TimesGCN, American Security News, Health Data Management, ABC NewsThe American Prospect, GoverningSustainable City Network, Michigan Radio, WJRT TV 12, Crain's Business Detroit, Phys.org, Detroit Free Press, EurekAlert, MLive, Healthcare Industry Today, US Department of Health and Human Services, Breast Cancer News, Detroit News, WZZM TV 13, WNEM TV 5, WEYI NBC 25, MIRS

Disobedience Awards

Massachusetts Institute of Technology | July 20
Both Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha and Professor Marc Edwards are scientists who became activists, using rigorous research to investigate the concerns of citizens in Flint, Michigan to unravel a mystery that many in positions of power would have preferred to keep under wraps. Both faced harassment and ridicule for their work and risked academic sanctions for defying conventions of peer review as they sought to bring attention to Flint's water crisis before more people were affected. Their work shows that science and scholarship are as powerful tools for social change as art and protest, and it challenges those of us in academia to use our powers for good.
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Flint Doctor Who Helped Expose Lead Water Crisis Is Fighting for the Most Vulnerable: ‘We’re Not Giving Up on These Kids

People.com | June 22
Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha - Hero of the Week. Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha remembers the exact moment she suspected there could be a lead problem for the residents of Flint, Michigan. She was at a dinner party in August 2015 when a friend told her that the city, where Hanna-Attisha has been a pediatrician since 2011, wasn’t using the proper corrosion control in their water-supply source after it switched from Detroit’s water system to the Flint River in April 2014.
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Partnership helps Flint families get access to healthier foods for second year

MSUToday | June 6
The Michigan State University and Hurley Children’s Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative has partnered with Tom Gores’ FlintNOW and the National Basketball Players Association, or NBPA, for the second year to provide Flint families access to healthier food through gift certificates totaling $300,000.
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103 great healthcare leaders to know in 2017

Becker's Hospital Review | March 24
Healthcare has been moving from volume to value-based care for the past decade with the passage and implementation of the ACA; now healthcare institutions need strong leadership to navigate the changing industry tides as Congress seeks to repeal and replace the ACA while continuing to promote higher quality care at a lower cost. Mona Hanna-Attisha, director of the pediatric residency program at Hurley Medical Center, is included as one of the great leaders to know. Hanna-Attisha is the director of the Michigan State University and Hurley Children's Hospital Public Health Initiative. Time named Hanna-Attisha among the 100 Influential People of the Year in 2016, and she received the Michigan State Medical Society Public Health Leadership Award last year.
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Two MSU faculty appointed to new state commission focused on eliminating child lead exposure

MSUToday | March 17
Gov. Rick Snyder has announced the creation of the Child Lead Exposure Elimination Commission, an effort that will continue Michigan’s fight against lead exposure, and has appointed Michigan State University's Mona Hanna-Attisha and Rebecca Meunick to the 15-member commission.
READ MORE | Related: Crain's Detroit Business, Mlive, Upper Michigan Source

Dr. Mona: Flint children "strong and brave" but will need decades of support to recover and thrive

MLive | March 16
Dr. Mona, as she's known affectionately around the world, is an assistant professor of pediatrics in the MSU College of Human Medicine and director of the Pediatric Residency Program at Hurley Children's Hospital in Flint. She was at MSU on March 16 to give a talk titled "Flint Water Crisis: Background and Next Steps" as part of the Broad College of Business' Business and Bagels Seminar Series. She and her colleagues have received funding from the state - with hopefully more from the federal government on the way - to build a large-scale registry to identify and track the children and to evaluate how they're doing.
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Honoring women across the Big Ten

Big Ten Network | March 8
It was Dr. Mona, director of the MSU-Hurley Medical Center’s Pediatric Public Health Initiative, who first documented the rising lead levels in Flint’s children and linked it to a change in the city’s water supply. And, it was Dr. Mona who, with relentless vigor, led the charge to inform residents of the water crisis and to demand action from local and state officials. The energy and passion she brought to her work on behalf of the children of Flint are what her colleague Dr. Aron Sousa refers to as her “superpowers.”
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Dr. Mona disapointed Trump didn't mention Flint

WKAR | March 1
President Trump delivered his first address before CongressTuesday.  He touched on themes ranging from immigration reform to counter terrorism to education.  One prominent guest in the audience came to hear Mr. Trump’s plans to resolve a crisis in Michigan that’s resounded around the world. Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha is the Flint pediatrician who blew the whistle on the city’s water crisis by revealing data about elevated blood lead levels in children.  She was in Washington as a guest of Rep. Dan Kildee (D-Flint).  “Dr. Mona,” as she’s known, told WKAR’s Kevin Lavery that there was one key word missing from President Trump’s speech.
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Flint's water crisis couldn't have happened in whiter, wealthier cities

Rewire | March 1
Flint’s inequity “is rooted in a dysfunctional state department,” Dr. Richard Sadler, an assistant professor doing public health research through the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine’s Division of Public Health, said in an interview with Rewire. Sadler assisted with the 2015 study undertaken by Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha that blew the whistle on the elevated blood lead levels found in children.
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Flint fades from spotlight, but water crisis won't fade for years

Journal Gazette | February 17
Hanna-Attisha or Dr. Mona – as she’s known around Flint – directs the MSU and Hurley Children’s Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative, an effort to research, monitor and mitigate the effects of lead in the city’s drinking water. Hanna-Attisha says the manmade disaster is a generational one that will require years of intervention. And though tragic, positives are arising from the situation. For one, Flint got the nation talking about water purity and other citizens around the country are now playing watchdog for their neighborhoods. Hanna-Attisha calls it part of “an awesome ripple effect.”
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Will we lose the doctor who would stop the next Flint?

New York Times Opinion | February 11
Mona Hanna-Attisha was the doctor and first-generation Iraqi immigrant who discovered the dangerous levels of lead in water in Flint, Michigan. Now she worries about what the country stands to lose.
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Can behavioral science help in Flint?

The New Yorker | January 23
Kent Key, the director of the Office of Community Scholars and Partnerships at Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine, said, “What the narrative has been about Flint is that we were this little poor, docile black community that didn’t have a voice, and needed someone to come and fix it for them.” On the contrary, he stressed, locals had been fighting the switch in the water source long before it happened. “When a community does everything right by the book,” he went on, “and your voice is still disregarded? To me, that speaks to a larger historical, systemic issue of the disregard for communities, particularly communities of color.”
READ MORE | Related: The Nonprofit Quarterly

Michigan State's Dr. Mona continues her fight for the health of Flint

BTN LiveBIG | January 21
Michigan State University pediatrician Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha wants you to know the Flint Water Crisis isn’t over. Yes, the quality of the city’s water has vastly improved, with lead levels below federal limits, but residents are still advised to use filters. It was Dr. Mona, director of the MSU-Hurley Medical Center’s Pediatric Public Health Initiative, who first documented the rising lead levels in Flint’s children and linked it to a change in the city’s water supply. And, it was Dr. Mona who, with relentless vigor, led the charge to inform residents of the water crisis and to demand action from local and state officials. 
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MDHHS awards $500,000 planning grant to MSU College of Human Medicine for Flint registry planning

MSUToday | January 13
One of the Flint Water Advisory Task Force recommendations included the creation of Registry for the long-term tracking of residents exposed to Flint water from April 2014 to present. Through this planning grant, MSU College of Human Medicine and the MSU-Hurley Children’s Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative, led by Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, will continue working with many community partners including the Greater Flint Health Coalition to build upon approximately one year of registry planning, building, convening and advocacy in order to develop the foundation for the registry. The intent of the registry will be to that identify, track and support Flint Water Crisis victims.
READ MORE | Related: ABC 12, Fox 47, WILX TV 10, Upper Michigan Source, Crain's Detroit Business, MLive, WNEM TV 5, Michigan Radio

Looking back on how state-supported suburban flight laid foundation for Flint water crisis

Michigan Radio's Stateside | January 9
Michigan State University public health expert and urban geographer Rick Sadler argues the true cause of Flint's water disaster goes back decades. Sadler and co-author Andrew Highsmith have published a study laying out their case in the journal Environmental Justice. Sadler joined Stateside to talk about the findings from the study and how, according to him, the public is missing the bigger picture by focusing on the emergency manager or the decision to switch the drinking water source.
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Newsmakers of the Year: Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha

Crain's Detroit Business | January 6
Mona Hanna-Attisha, M.D., the pediatrician who blew the public whistle on the lead poisoning of children and adults in Flint in one of the nation's biggest preventable environmental disasters, continues to advocate for clean and safe drinking and bathing water. "To this day our water is still not safe," said Hanna-Attisha, who practices at Hurley Medical Center in Flint and is the director of the MSU-Hurley Children’s Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative. "I am more hopeful than I have been because Congress passed federal funding for Flint that brings significant money ($170 million) for infrastructure to finally replace the plumbing."
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WATCH VIDEO

Speaking out on lead, FLint pediatrician fulfills calling

American Medical Association Wire | January 3
When the children of Flint, Mich., were in danger and the people of Flint were ignored, pediatrician Mona Hanna-Attisha, MD, MPH, raised her voice in protest. That is because sometimes, with an activist spirit and the help of scientific evidence, a physician is in the perfect position to give a voice to those who are the most vulnerable.
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Take One Apple, Twice A Day - Better Nutrition for Flint Kids
My City Magazine | January 2
Most Flint kids are eating one or fewer fruits or veggies a day. One of many results of this is a high obesity rate for children in the Flint area; as of 2011, 71 percent of Genesee County residents are either obese or overweight. With a grant, Hurley Children’s Center has been operating a new program that provides integrated nutritional education services and resources for at-risk children.
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Life in Flint a year into the state of emergency over tap water

ABC News | December 23
An initiative to diagnose and help children who have developmental delays after lead exposure is in progress. Hanna-Attisha along with others at the Hurley Medical Center are working with Michigan State University and the Genesee County Health Department as part of the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, which started in January. 
READ MORE | Related: WTIC AM RadioWMAY RadioWBT Radio

Medscape names the best and worst physicians of 2016

Becker's Hospital Review | December 22
Best physicians of 2016: Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha leads the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, a multidisciplinary task force that works to diminish the harm done to children in Flint, Mich., due to lead-contaminated drinking water. She was named one of Time's Most Influential People in 2016.
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After Flint's lead crisis, the most important medical for kids is education

PBS NewsHouse | December 20
More than a year after alarmingly high levels of lead were found in Flint’s water supply, the city has opened a free all-day early childhood center for children 2 months to 5 years of age. Mona Hanna-Attisha, a pediatrician who discovered elevated lead levels in Flint’s children, says there’s a well-established link between lead exposure and learning disabilities.
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2016 Got Science? Champions

Union of Concerned Scientists | December 19
When Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha heard rumors about lead in the water, she researched her hospital’s records and found an irrefutable correlation between the switch to Flint River water and spiking diagnoses of lead poisoning in children. She immediately went public with her results—and just as quickly, officials tried to discredit her. “I was put through the wringer when my credibility was questioned,” Dr. Hanna-Attisha says. “But for eighteen months Flint residents were ignored. Thinking about them—and particularly the children who, through no fault of their own, were exposed to a neurotoxin—put steel in my spine to speak truth to power.” 
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MSU study uncovers real culprits behind Flint water crisis

MSUToday | December 7
Many believe the events leading to the lead poisoning of Flint’s drinking water began in April 2014, when it started drawing from the Flint River. Others believe it began in November 2011, when Gov. Rick Snyder appointed an emergency manager to take control of Flint’s government. While those actions were immediate and important factors in the crisis, Richard Sadler, an assistant professor of public health and co-author of a new Michigan State University study, has found that in order to understand its real genesis, one must go back decades and examine a series of governmental, social and economic policies that led to the city’s decline and ultimately to the contamination. 
READ MORE | Related: Fox 47Futurity

Gov. Snyder appoints Drs. Hanna-Attisha and Furr-Holden to Public Health Advisory Commission

MSUToday | November 22
Gov. Rick Snyder has announced the appointments of 18 members to the Public Health Advisory Commission, including MSU College of Human Medicine faculty, Mona Hanna-Attisha and Debra Furr-Holden.
READ MORE | Related: State of MichiganNBC TV 6

Mona Hanna-Attisha: Resolve exposed Flint water crisis

Detroit News | November 18
Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha was primed from the start for her heroic role in uncovering problems in Flint’s city water system that resulted in the lead poisoning of roughly 10,000 children. The daughter of Iraqi-American scientists who fled Saddam Hussein’s dictatorship said her training and instincts compelled her to investigate and hold bureaucrats’ feet to the fire when they denied the results of her research that proved children were being poisoned.
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Academic medicine uniquely positioned to address public health crises

AAMC News | November 13
In a local effort, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine (MSU) engaged each part of its tripartite mission to respond to the effects of a lead-contaminated water supply on the residents of Flint. At the forefront of the response was Mona Hanna-Attisha, MD, MPH, a community-engaged pediatrician who provides care in a low-income area and is director of the pediatric residency program at Hurley Medical Center. Hanna-Attisha and colleagues analyzed blood level data and published their findings in a study in the American Journal of Public Health.
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Flint doctor to be 'Millionaire' contestant

Detroit News | October 28
Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha will be in the “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” hot seat 3 p.m. Thursday on CBS in Detroit for “Hometown Heroes Week.” Though she’s not allowed to say if she won a million bucks, or nothing at all, the doctor known for discovering elevated levels of lead in Flint children who drank the city’s water says it was an “amazing” opportunity to be on the trivia game show that gives contestants a chance to win $1 million. “It was a really surreal experience to be there with the lights and the cameras and trying to win money for Flint kids,” she said.
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AAP National Conference: Dr. Hanna-Attisha used advocacy to preserve kids' futures

American Academy of Pediatrics | October 24
While the children in Flint, Mich., still do not have water they can drink, they now have access to a full complement of health, nutrition, education and transportation services to help support their development and mitigate effects of lead poisoning. At Sunday’s plenary session, Mona Hanna-Attisha, M.D., M.P.H., FAAP, shared her story of advocacy, persistence and community resilience after the city’s water supply became contaminated with lead.
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Panelists discuss rebuilding relationship between state officials, Flint residents

Michigan Daily | October 24
Kent Key, director of the Office of Community Scholars and Partnerships at Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine and another panelist, connected his work in vetting the numerous researchers entering Flint to the University of Michigan community in his talk. He has created the Healthy Flint Research Coordinating Center, which was funded by both the University of Michigan and Michigan State University as a way to encourage an ethical and respectable community, as well as academic partnerships.
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Outstanding Contribution to Healthcare in 2016

Medical Marketing & Media | October 6
Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha was awarded Medical Marketing & Media's Platinum Award for Outstanding Contribution to Healthcare in 2016. Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha immediately took action when she learned that the drinking water in Flint, Michigan, was very likely contaminated with lead. The Hurley Medical Center in Flint, where she directs the pediatric residents program, routinely screens children for lead exposure, so she compared the lead levels in blood samples taken before and after Flint's water supply was switched from the Detroit River to the Flint River. 
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MSU received USDA's prestigious award for its Flint water response

MSUToday | October 5
Michigan State University Extension was honored by the United States Department of Agriculture for the organization’s quick and comprehensive response to the residents of Flint affected by lead-contaminated drinking water. The prestigious Abraham Lincoln Honor Award for External Partnerships recognizes groups who have made outstanding contributions that support the USDA’s mission and goals. Deanna East, an MSU Extension associate director focused on health and nutrition programming, who helped coordinate the organization’s response in Flint, said that this team effort included coordination with the Pediatric Public Health Initiative (PPHI), led by Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha. The initiative includes Hurley Children’s Hospital and the MSU College of Human Medicine.
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APHA announces 2016 awards winners

American Public Health Association | September 27
The American Public Health Association today announced the 2016 winners of its prestigious national awards, which recognize individuals for leadership, innovation and excellence in the field. Mona Hanna-Attisha, MD, MPH, FAAP, director of the Michigan State University and Hurley Children’s Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative; and Marc Edwards, PhD, Charles Lunsford professor of civil engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, are honored for their roles in bringing attention to elevated blood lead levels among residents of Flint, Michigan, during the city’s water crisis. They are the first joint honorees of the David P. Rall Award for Advocacy in Public Health.
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Academy creates blueprint to guide next US president on children's health matters

American Academy of Pediatrics | September 20
From poverty to education, the Academy has created a roadmap designed to guide the next U.S. president on issues that will impact children’s health and well-being. AAP leaders and other experts gathered Monday to discuss the plan Blueprint for Children: How the Next President Can Build a Foundation for a Healthy Future. Monday’s panel discussion moderated by ABC News Chief Health and Medical Editor Richard Besser, M.D., FAAP, touched on each of these areas with input from  Mona Hanna-Attisha, M.D., M.P.H., FAAP, director of Michigan State University and Hurley Children’s Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative and other experts. 
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How ZIP codes nearly masked the lead problem in Flint

The Conversation US | September 19
I write this as we approach the first anniversary of my involvement in the Flint Water Crisis, an ongoing catastrophe and basic failure of government accountability that will soon approach three years. On Sept. 25, 2015, I received a call from my colleague – the now-renowned Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha – asking if I could run some basic spatial analysis of blood lead data collected from area pediatric clinics. I had heard rumblings that blood lead levels were on the rise in Flint but that state officials were pushing back against her findings.
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Politico's 50 List: Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha

Politico Magazine | September 12
The Flint water crisis quickly morphed into a political scandal this year when it became clear that government officials had endangered the health of thousands of adults and children. Two scientists, Marc Edwards and Mona Hanna-Attisha, helped to hold the state accountable for its negligence in creating a health crisis; he uncovered the cause, and she, the effects.
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Health Care Connect interviews Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha

Sirius XM Radio's Doctor Radio | September 7

From hurt to healing: Doctor leads charge to create healthier future for Flint's kids

The Hub Flint | August Issue
For Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha the work has just begun. Widely celebrated as a heroine for her role in exposing the public health issue stemming from Flint's lead-contaminated municipal water system, she has entrenched herself in the next stage of providing professional care.
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An in-depth interview with Flint water crisis Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha

WXYZ TV 7 Detroit | August 12
You've seen Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha in the news for her role in helping to expose the Flint water crisis.  She's a Michigan educated and trained pediatrician at the Hurley Medical Center who also teaches at Michigan State University.  The woman who has been called a "global hero" will be our guest to give us an update on the children of Flint and the long-term healthcare battle they face with their families.  
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Flint's lead crisis will cost each of its children $50,00 in their lifetimes

VICE News | August 9
Local groups are pushing to change that outcome. Flint's Hurley Children's Hospital and Michigan State University have formed a pediatric public health initiative to help address the lead exposure problem. Generally local mitigation efforts have been focused on supporting areas like early childhood, access to healthy foods, and behavioral health services.
READ MORE | Related: Business Insider

Flint's growing mental health crisis

Detroit Free Press | August 7
Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, a pediatrician who helped expose the lead problem in Flint and is director of the Michigan State University and Hurley Children's Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative, said families want to know whether the lead-contaminated water caused issues they are seeing.
READ MORE | Related: Florida CourierGrand Haven Tribune

Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha named one of 2016 Health Care Heroes

Crain's Detroit Business | July 18
For Hanna-Attisha, discovering high levels of lead in Flint's water supply turned her into an instant activist. She said she had no choice but to speak out on behalf of children and their parents. "My days are longer," said Hanna-Attisha, who also is director with the Michigan State University/Hurley Pediatric Public Health Plan Initiative. "It is nonstop, every week. It is intense. The media comes and goes, but our work is just beginning for the kids and community; it is a long-term commitment."
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AAP: Prevent lead exposure before it starts

MedPage Today | June 20
The AAP last released a policy statement on lead exposure diagnosis and management in 2012, prior to the updated CDC recommendations. While not involved with the research, Kenneth Rosenman, MD, of Michigan State University called the policy "worth reading by all practitioners," not just those who care for children.
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Flint water, city schools on agenda at Mackinac biz conference

Bridge Magazine | June 2
Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, the pediatrician who first drew attention to elevated levels of lead in Flint children’s blood, was to speak Wednesday. She is assistant professor of pediatrics at Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine and director of the pediatric residency program at Hurley Children’s Hospital in Flint. She also leads the MSU/Hurley Pediatric Public Health Initiative.
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National Basketball Players Association and Tom Gores’ FlintNOW Partner With Pediatric Public Health Initiative to Improve Access to Healthy Food for Flint Families

MSUToday | June 1
Flint families will have better access to healthy food, thanks to a partnership between the NBPA, FlintNOW and the MSU-Hurley Children's Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative. The partnership includes 8,000 “nutrition backpacks” which will be distributed on June 6 to Flint public school children in grades K-6. Each bag will include three $5 Flint Farmers’ Market gift certificates, information about healthy eating, nutrition and lead, and a mini basketball. Every $5 certificate redeemed will be rewarded on site with a second $5 gift certificate for a later visit to encourage families to build sustainable healthy eating habits, bringing the total value of each bag to $30.
READ MORE | Related: WNEM TV 5Pistons News

What life is like in Flint, Michigan, three years into the water crisis

ABC News | May 29
Mona Hanna-Attisha, a local pediatrician, has been studying the lead levels in children in the community for years and helped draw attention to the crisis by publishing a paper finding children in Flint had significantly higher lead levels than their counterparts in surrounding areas after the water source was changed. Hanna-Attisha along with others at the Hurley Medical Center are working with Michigan State University and the Genesee County Health Department as part of the Pediatric Public Health Initiative started in January.
READ MORE | Related: WBAL RadioABC News Radio NetworkWJBD AMWMAY AM

MSU helps Flint in new national health program

MSUToday | May 17
The city of Flint has been selected by Reinvestment Fund and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to take part in a new Invest Health initiative and Michigan State University is helping to lead the way. Debra Furr-Holden, a Charles Stewart Mott Foundation Endowed Professor of Public Health in the College of Human Medicine, will represent MSU in an effort that is aimed at transforming how leaders from mid-size American cities work together to help low-income communities thrive. Invest Health will pay particular attention to community features that drive health such as access to safe and affordable housing, places to play and exercise and quality jobs.
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National Basketball Players Association and Tom Gores’ FlintNOW Partner With Pediatric Public Health Initiative to Improve Access to Healthy Food for Flint Families

Flint families will have better access to healthy food, thanks to a partnership between the NBPA, FlintNOW and the MSU-Hurley Children's Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative. The partnership includes 8,000 “nutrition backpacks” which will be distributed on June 6 to Flint public school children in grades K-6. Each bag will include three $5 Flint Farmers’ Market gift certificates, information about healthy eating, nutrition and lead, and a mini basketball. Every $5 certificate redeemed will be rewarded on site with a second $5 gift certificate for a later visit to encourage families to build sustainable healthy eating habits, bringing the total value of each bag to $30.
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Flint, DPS crises to lead Detroit chamber's 2016 Mackinac Policy Conference

Crain's Business Detroit | May 12
Mona Hanna-Attisha, M.D., the physician who first drew attention to elevated levels of lead in Flint children's blood, will give a "Mackinac Moment" speech on June 1. She is assistant professor of pediatrics atMichigan State University's College of Human Medicine and director of the pediatric residency program at Hurley Children's Hospital in Flint. She also leads the MSU/Hurley Pediatric Public Health Initiative.
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Rite Aid presents Hurley with check to help fund pediatric program

Davison Index | May 12
Rite Aid Pharmacies presented a check of $100,000 last Thursday, May 5, toward the Hurley Foundation’s Hospital longterm pediatric efforts in intervening on the damaging effects of Flint’s water crisis. Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, Director, Michigan State University and Hurley Children’s Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative; Richard Warmbold, Ph.D., Hurley Foundation President; and Tracy Henderson, Rite Aid Foundation and Charitable Giving Initiatives Director were all in attendance.
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MSU Spring Undergraduate Convocation featuring Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha

WKAR | May 10
Mona Hanna-Attisha of Michigan State University College of Human Medicine delivers the Spring 2016 commencement address. Hanna-Attisha and her team helped prove the children of Flint had been poisoned by lead-contaminated water. During the ceremony Hanna-Attisha receives an honorary doctorate of science and MSU alumna Kristina Ford receives an honorary doctorate of humanities.
WATCH VIDEO

Hanna-Attisha tells MSU graduates to stand up, speak out

Detroit News | May 6
Raise your hand. That was the message that Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha delivered Friday to the Class of 2016 during commencement ceremonies at Michigan State University. The MSU assistant professor of pediatrics — who found elevated levels of lead in Flint children last summer, and changed the trajectory of the water crisis — said there were many people who raised their hand long before officials started listening.
READ MORE | Related: New York TimesFox NewsGreenfield ReporterFree Press,Philadelphia TribuneElkhart TruthLansing State JournalBlack Daily NewsNews Talk WSJMTrib TownTownHall 

Doctor who helped expose Flint water crisis speaking at MSU

CBS Detroit | May 6
doctor credited with bringing Flint’s crisis with lead-tainted drinking water to the public’s attention after state agencies initially dismissed her concerns is the speaker at Michigan State University’s undergraduate commencement ceremony. Mona Hanna-Attisha speaks Friday at the Breslin Student Events Center and will receive an honorary doctorate of science.
READ MORE | Related: MSU TodayWLNSDetroit Free PressWashington TimesNBC 25,Greenville Daily ReporterLansing State Journal

Promise for Flint

MSUToday | May 5
Physician Mona Hanna-Attisha of MSU's College of Human Medicine and her team helped prove the children of Flint, Michigan, had been poisoned by a lead-contaminated water supply. Now the director of the MSU and Hurley Children’s Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative is championing the long-term well-being of the city’s children by partnering to build a new public health model that will bring hope to those fighting to be heard.
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The water crisis in Flint and how a community-based medical school came to the rescue

AAMC | April 30
Aron Sousa, MD, interim dean at MSU’s medical school, said that a community participatory infrastructure had been in place before the crisis. In 2012, two years before the water became toxic, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation awarded the college a $2.8 million planning grant to expand its medical education and public health research in Flint. With this funding, the college formed an advisory committee to work with hospital partners and more than 80 community organizations, government agencies, and the business community to examine social determinants of health in Flint and how to reduce health disparities.
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Community, multi-university campus partnership to address public health challenges in Flint

MSUToday | April 26
Flint community partners and three major Michigan university campuses have announced a new partnership to help address, through coordinated research efforts, the current and future status of residents and their health. The new initiative, the Healthy Flint Research Coordinating Center, brings together Flint’s Community Based Organization Partners, or CBOP, Michigan State University, the University of Michigan Flint and the University of Michigan Ann Arbor. Working with CBOP, a coalition of community-based organizations, will ensure community needs stay at the forefront in current and future research efforts in the Flint community. “Michigan State has been a knowledge partner in Flint for a century now, and this effort will further complement the Hurley/MSU Pediatric Public Health Initiative and the other health, education and community building efforts we’re involved in today,” says MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon. “With our University of Michigan colleagues, we are pleased to offer Flint residents a new point of access to a tremendous reservoir of collective expertise and to give our own researchers additional channels to serve the community."
READ MORE | Related: Davison IndexMlive

Three officials charged for the Flint water crisis

State of the State KS | April 24
Aron Sousa, MD, interim dean, MSU College of Human Medicine said of Hanna-Attisha: “Her science and advocacy demonstrate why public intellectual institutions like hospitals and universities are important to the health and safety of Americans. "It definitely goes much higher."
READ MORE | Related: People's World

Mona Hanna-Attisha named on of TIME's most influential people

MSU Today | April 21
TIME has named Mona Hanna-Attisha, director of the Michigan State University and Hurley Children’s Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative to the 2016 TIME 100, its annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world. The full list and related tributes will appear in the May 2 issue of TIME, which will be available on newsstands on Friday, April 22. 
READ MORE | Related: MSU 360 PerspectiveTIME MagazineCrain's Detroit BusinessDetroit NewsWFNT 1470 AMMacomb DailyOakland PressFOX 47Becker's Hospital ReviewDexter PatchState NewsSwartz Creek View

The hero of Flint's water crisis

University of Michigan Alumni Association | April 19
Until then, tests of the Flint water had produced some results that were worrisome but not conclusive enough to grab the world’s attention. Hanna-Attisha, director of the Pediatric Residency Program at Flint’s Hurley Medical Center and a Michigan State University medical school professor, was the first to document that the number of Flint children with elevated blood-lead levels had nearly doubled since Flint started drawing its water from the river. In some neighborhoods, they later learned, the numbers had nearly tripled.
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MSU and Hurley Children's Hospital announce Pediatric Public Health Initiative to support the health of Flint children

Innovative Health Magazine | April 19
The Pediatric Public Health Initiative brings together experts in pediatrics, child development, psychology, epidemiology, nutrition, toxicology, geography and education, and includes the Genesee County Health Department, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services and MSU Extension. The intent is to address the Flint population-wide lead exposure from multiple fronts and provide the tools and resources for the assessment, continued research and monitoring, and interventions necessary for improving children’s health and development. The foundation for this new initiative leverages MSU’s recently expanded Division of Public Health, supported by the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, that has brought new public health researchers to Flint and MSU College of Human Medicine’s 35-year medical education collaboration with Hurley Medical Center.
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Flint doctor topping Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump in Time 100 vote

MLive | April 13
Final votes are being cast forTime Magazine's 100 most influential people list, with a Flint doctor who informed the public of elevated lead in children in the running for the recognition. Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, director of the Pediatric Residency Program at Hurley Medical Center, is currently at 1.1 percent of the vote total, alongside U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, talk show hosts Stephen Colbert and John Oliver, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel.
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Why Flint's life expectancy is below the national average

Time | April 11
“Genesee County has poverty, but it also has had the deterioration of its infrastructures and institutional services because of what’s happened economically,” says Dr. Aron Sousa, interim dean at Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine.
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Flint offers a new model for accountability

Huffington Post | April 11
Inspired by Edwards’ example, though, another academic collected more crucial data. Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, director of the pediatric residency program at Flint’s Hurley Medical Center and an assistant professor at Michigan State University, did an independent study on lead levels in Flint children, and found blood lead levels had doubled and even tripled in some areas after the switch to Flint river water.
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Flint's crisis raises questions - and cautions - about the role of philanthropy

Philanthropy News Digest | April 8
The Mott Foundation has provided nearly $23 million in support since 2011 to Flint's growing health-and-wellness district. Some of that funding has helped position two anchor institutions in the district, the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine and Hurley Children's Center, to lead the new Pediatric Public Health Initiative that will address the many health and behavioral impacts of children's exposure to lead.
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Initiative hopes to provide 1 million glasses of milk for Flint families

MLive | April 4
The United Dairy Industry of Michigan and Kroger has started an initiative to provide 1 million glasses to milk to families in Flint to try and combat the potential health consequences associated with the city's water crisis. Entitled flintmilk.org, the Flint Pediatric Public Health Initiative recommended a mission by the UDIM towards long-term dietary needs of children impacted by having ingested lead into their bodies through drinking water. 
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Soil could cause lead levels to rise in Flint kids

USA TODAY | March 31
The level of lead in the blood of children in Flint probably will rise over the next few months, not because of continued problems with the city's drinking water supply, but because of high levels of lead in the soil — especially in the city's oldest and densest areas — that gets inhaled into their bodies during the summer, according to Michigan State University researcher Rick Sadler, College of Human Medicine public health researcher, who says yearly seasonal cyclical pattern — which is not unique to Flint, but is common to most big cities — is expected to recur, even as state officials expect the lead levels in Flint's drinking water to diminish. 
READ MORE | Related: MSU TodayDetroit Free PressClick on DetroitEurekAlertWKAR,Eurasia ReviewScience 2.0

Flint water doc to speak at MSU commencement

Lansing State Journal | March 31
Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha is an assistant professor of pediatrics at the MSU College of Human Medicine whose work in Flint helped to expose an ongoing public health crisis. She will address MSU graduating seniors during spring convocation on May 6.
READ MORE | MSU Today, WDIV-TV4, Detroit NewsFox 47 NewsState NewsFree Press

The future for Flint's children [Opinion by Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha]

New York Times | March 26
Families here are traumatized; faith and trust in government have evaporated. State and federal agencies responsible for protecting them failed miserably. Much has been written about the roots of the Flint water crisis: misguided fiscal austerity, inequality, racism, environmental injustice, poverty, deindustrialization. These are all important and nationally relevant issues, but the focus now needs to turn to the future, and to healing. We cannot wait to see the potential cognitive and behavioral consequences; we must act. Developmental neurobiology has taught us that adverse childhood experiences and toxic stress change the trajectory of a child’s life in predictable ways.
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What you may not know about California's lead-tainted water

Digital Journal | March 27
What's even more frustrating is that the contamination was discovered months before the tragic situation in Flint, but authorities in Michigan are already using maps that pinpoint children's blood levels and help target neighborhoods for water sampling, bottled water, filters and lead line replacement, according to Mona Hanna-Attisha, a pediatrician and assistant professor at Michigan State University.
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Flint doctor among nominees for Time Magazine's 100 most influential people

Time | March 24
The whistleblowing doctor that informed the world of elevated lead levels in children's blood in Flint amid the water crisis has been nominated for a prestigious recognition. Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, director of the Pediatric Residency Program at Hurley Medical Center and assistant professor of Pediatrics and Human Development at Michigan State University's College of Human Medicine, has been nominated for Time Maganize's 100 most influential people list.
READ MORE | Related: Patch

Flint water crisis fund names grant-making advisory committee members

MLive | March 24
The Community Foundation of Greater Flint has announced the eight-member advisory committee that will handle grants for money donated to the Flint Child Health & Development Fund. The advisory committee members will include Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, director of the Pediatric Residency Program at Hurley Medical Center and assistant professor of Pediatrics and Human Development at Michigan State University's College of Human Medicine, among others.
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You win some, you lose some

MSUToday | March 23
I had been texting with my daughter during the game and at this point was telling her how awful it felt that the Spartans lost. And then, in all her wisdom (when did she get so smart?) she texted me back this photo she happened across in a magazine at the moment I texted her. She said, “Hey, would you rather the Spartans win basketball, or have one featured in national publications for trying to solve one of the hugest problems to hit the state?” The photo, of course, is of Mona Hanna-Attisha, an assistant professor in the MSU College of Human Medicine and director of the MSU-Hurley Children’s Hospital Pediatric Public Health Initiative. She, along with her team, is credited with discovering the increased levels of lead in children in Flint during the water crisis.
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University of Michigan launches tri-campus collaboration

Michigan Daily | March 22
The long-term health effects project will focus on an integrated approach, according to a press release. A team of experts from the School of Public Health, UM-Flint’s School of Health Professions and Studies, and Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine will look into the medical, psycho-social, developmental and economic impact of lead poisoning by monitoring a group of affected residents over time.
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Physician at forefront of Flint water crisis to speak at Albion College

MLive | March 20
Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha will speak about "Health Risks of Children Growing Up in Poverty" at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 23, in Room 101 of the college's Towsley Lecture Hall. Hanna-Attisha is director of the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine's Pediatrics Program at Flint's Hurley Hospital.
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Flint doc: Health initiative like 'building a plane while flying it'

WKAR | March 17
A trio of MSU researchers gathered yesterday in Lansing to discuss aspects of the Flint water crisis. In its monthly public policy forum, the university’s Institute for Public Policy and Social Research gave guest speakers a chance to discuss the responsibilities of state and local governments in addressing the water emergency and the work being done regarding the health of Flint residents. Current State talks with two of the speakers: Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, who’s become renowned as a whistle-blower in the Flint crisis and  head of the recently launched Pediatric Public Health Initiative involving MSU and Flint’s Hurley Hospital, and Michigan State political science professor Joshua Sapotichne.
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"Flint's kids were getting sick; We had to find out why"

Glamour | March 15
Three miles away pediatrician Mona Hanna-Attisha, M.D., 39, was seeing rashes in her patients too. Then she heard reports that the city's tap water might be contaminated—a General Motors plant had stopped using it, fearing it would corrode their car parts—and those allegations nagged at her. "But the government reassured us it was safe," she says. Authorities sent repeated notices telling residents not to worry; even the mayor said his family was drinking tap water.
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Flint water crisis fund tops $4M, hopes for boost with telethon

MLive | March 13
An advisory committee has been put together to target nonprofit organizations where grants will go to areas targeted by lead mitigation strategies developed through Michigan State University's Pediatric Health Initiative being led by Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, founding donor of the fund.
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Thanks to UM and MSU, Flint finds hope amid crisis

Big Ten Network Live Big | March 11
Last fall, most people in the state of Michigan were closely following two storylines: the Spartans football team’s run for the Big Ten crown, and new Wolverines head coach Jim Harbaugh’s restoration of that program to glory. But football wasn’t the most important thing on the mind of Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, assistant professor of pediatrics at Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine. Following a trail of anecdotal leads and previous research reports, Hanna-Attisha and her colleagues launched an intense investigation into the rate of lead poisoning among the children of Flint, Mich.
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City of Flint gets help from its 'home teams'

Big Ten Network Live Big | March 10
And it was research from Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, assistant professor of pediatrics at Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine, that initially blew the lid off this story. As a local resident and the director of the Public Health Initiative led by MSU and the Hurley Children’s Hospital in Flint, she frames this challenge in personal terms.
READ MORE | Related: MLive

Doctor named Humanitarian of the Year for Flint crisis

Detroit Business | March 9
Community members, civic leaders, and federal elected officials will join the Chaldean American Chamber of Commerce to honor business and community leaders at the 13th Annual Awards Dinner including Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, director, Pediatric Residency Program at Hurley Medical Center, as Humanitarian of the Year. Hanna-Attisha, formerly of Royal Oak, will be honored on April 29 at the Shenandoah Country Club in West Bloomfield. 
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Flint water crisis whistleblowing doctor to get humanitarian award

MLive | March 8
The Flint doctor that's become a nationally-known name and face in the midst of the city's water crisis is set to receive another award for her work inuncovering high lead level results in children of the community. The Chaldean American Chamber of Commerce will honor Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha with the organization's Humanitarian of the Year award during a 6 p.m. April 29 ceremony at Shenandoah Country Club in West Bloomfield.
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Mother, doctor honored for exposing Flint water crisis

MLive | March 4
The doctor and Flint mother who were at the center of exposing the city's water crisis have been honored with the 2016 PEN/Toni and James C. Goodale Freedom of Expression Courage Award. LeeAnne Walters and Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha were announced Friday, March 4, as the winners of the award, which was established in 2014 to honor exceptional acts of courage in the use of freedom of speech. Hanna-Attisha, an assistant professor of pediatrics at Michigan State University and clinician at Hurley Medical Center, conducted the testing that revealed spikes in the number of children in the city testing positive for elevated blood lead levels.
READ MORE | Related: Lansing State Journal, PEN America

Beyond the water crisis

What's ahead for the Pediatric Public Health Initiative and Flint public health research
WATCH THE LIVESTREAM

MSU and WKAR develop app that empowers Flint residents during water crisis

WKAR | March 1
MSU College of Human Medicine professor Rick Sadler was among the partners helping developers connect with future app users. Since 2008, the public health expert has been working to provide healthy food options to Flint residents. “The great thing about apps is that you can routinely push new info to the public, making it easier to stay up to date," Sadler said. "This is really important in our current situation, and this app is a way we can combine our efforts."
READ MORE | Related: MSUToday

MSU-Flint relationship extends beyond water crisis

Lansing State Journal | February 29
Michigan State University recognized the city's public health needs back in 2012 and expanded its presence in Flint to meet those needs. The College of Human Medicine has doubled its number of third and fourth-year medical students in Flint-area hospitals to 100 in recent years and partnered with Hurley Children's Hospital to start a new Pediatric Public Health Initiative earlier this year. Two grants from the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation totaling nearly $12 million helped MSU reclaim a landmark building in downtown Flint. The grants also paid for the hiring of a team of researchers to diagnose and find solutions to health concerns, a team that found itself in the position to respond quickly to lead crisis, doing work that ranged from mapping where lead levels were most devastating to educating Flint residents about what they need to do to combat symptoms of lead poisoning.
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Voices from the field: 10 lessons from Flint

In-Training | February 29
This is the first installation of a three-part series entitled “Ten Lessons from Flint” in which Northeast Ohio Medical University student Katherine Joyce, MPH, speaks with Professor Marc Edwards of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, pediatrician Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha of Hurley Children’s Hospital and Michigan State University, and interim Dean Dr. Aron Sousa of Michigan State University. Many thanks to the public health heroes who took time to contribute their thoughts.
READ MORE | Related: Part 2 and Part 3

Flint's poorest area is at center of crisis

Wall Street Journal | February 28
Flint pediatrician Mona Hanna-Attisha and researchers at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine are mapping the rise in blood lead levels in Flint children found the highest percentages of children with elevated levels in the Fifth Ward, which contains part of Flint’s downtown that has seen recent redevelopment but also streets with boarded-up houses near a vast former General Motors complex.
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Flint water focus of MSU forum

MSUToday | February 24
Forum speakers include MSU researchers with insights into community management, utilities and pediatric health, including the doctor who publicly sounded the alarm about the health of children exposed to high levels of lead, Mona Hanna-Attisha.
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Mona Hanna-Attisha: "Flipping the story" in Flint

MLive | February 23
Michigan State University and Hurley Children's Hospital have announced a new Pediatric Public Health Initiative to address the Flint community's population-wide lead exposure and help all Flint children grow up healthy and strong. "It's our effort to flip the story," says Mona Hanna-Attisha, director of the pediatric residency program at Hurley Medical Center in Flint, and assistant professor of pediatrics and human development at Michigan State University's College of Human Medicine. You know her as Dr. Mona from the Flint Water crisis. "We're trying to build a model public health program."
READ MORE | Related: The Spartan Podcast

Zumba-thon raises money for Pediatric Public Health Initiative

Fox 17 | February 22
Hundreds gathered in Flint for a fundraiser for the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, a joint effort by Michigan State University College of Human Medicine and Hurley Children's Hospital.
Related: Fox 13, Fox 43

In Flint, moving the farmers market drew more poor shoppers

NPR's The Salt | February 19
Rick Sadler, a public health professor at the Flint campus of Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, first interviewed shoppers at the Flint Farmers' Market in 2011, seeking to understand the demographics of its customers. Three years later, the market made a controversial move from an industrial area north of the city core — inaccessible to public transit and pedestrians — to a central downtown location across from the bus station. That prompted Sadler to return in 2015, to see if the customer demographics had shifted. They had: At the new location, the market was seeing far more shoppers from the city's poorer neighborhoods.
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Q&A: Lead poisoning and other silent public health threats

MedPage Today | February 19
Efforts to resolve the water crisis in Flint, Mich., continue, with HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell touring the city yesterday and announcing $500,000 in funding to help two area health centers. Earlier this week, Mona Hanna-Attisha, MD, the pediatrician who discovered the lead levels in the water, presented an update on the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, with interventions designed to help the children of Flint who were exposed to lead. Given the breadth of this issue, we contacted a wide range of experts -- from toxicology experts to pediatric and environmental health specialists -- via email to ask.
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MSU outlines nutrition initiative for Flint children

Detroit News | February 19
Michigan State University is tackling the hurdles facing Flint families in the wake of the water crisis, with a particular focus on nutrition as a way of combating lead poisoning in the city’s children. Those efforts were in the spotlight at the university’s Board of Trustees meeting, where members heard from school officials and researchers such as Rick Sadler, a geographer working in MSU’s College of Human Medicine.
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MSU leaders weigh in on research efforts

WZZM TV 13 | February 18
Michigan State University leaders are continuing to try to help kids affected by lead poisoning in Flint. Last night, experts from their College of Human Medicine and a number of other organizations weighed in. They say they've been researching public health in Flint for years now. But they've amped up their efforts since the water crisis came to light. Panel members say they're also studying the health of adults affected in Flint.

MSU researchers say lead just one of many things hurting Flint kids

WILX TV 10 | February 18
MSU formed a pediatric public health initiative to assess, monitor, and reduce the impact of lead on Flint and its children. The Dean of the College of Human Medicine in Flint says the school is uniquely positioned to help. "We have the space," Dr. Aron Sousa said. "And really remarkable, internationally-known scholars who focus on community health, community participatory research, who have come here to do their work."
READ MORE | Related: Fox 47 News

Pediatrician sees long road ahead for Flint after lead poisoning crisis

Journal of the American Medical Association | February 17
Concern about lead exposure in her pediatric patients thrust Mona Hanna-Attisha, MD, director of the pediatric residency program at Hurley Medical Center in Flint, Michigan, into the eye of a growing public health scandal surrounding lead contamination in Flint’s water supply.
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MSU College of Human Medicine helping with lead water crisis

Fox 66 | February 17
A new initiative from Michigan State University hopes to help the city move beyond the lead water crisis. Researchers are looking to find solutions to reduce the health effects of lead exposure. The university introduced four researchers at an event Wednesday night in downtown Flint. The doctors are studying different impacts lead exposure could have on the lives of local children.
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Feeding a city with better food sources

MSUToday | February 17
Access to clean water hasn't been the only health issue facing Flint. Since 2008, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine public health expert, Rick Sadler, has been mapping out areas of the city that have had almost no access to healthier food options and evaluating solutions that could help remedy the problem. The Flint native's most recent study, published in the journal Applied Geography, has found that simply changing the location of a farmers' market to downtown Flint has brought cascading positive effects to residents of the area.
READ MORE | Related: WLNS TV 6Fox 47eScience NewsScience CodexSeattle PI,Washington TimesKSLPendleton Times PostWDIV TVAlpena News

Beyond lead: Crisis highlighted larger issue

Fox 17 | February 17
Health officials and experts with Michigan State University College of Human Medicine say the crisis in Flint highlighted a much larger public health issue in the city. Today, staff with the university alongside doctors from Flint discussed more than 160 health research projects MSU is currently working on in Flint in partnership with the CS Mott Foundation and Hurley Children's Hospital.

MSU researches effects of lead contamination in Flint water crisis

WLNS TV-6 | February 17
Michigan State University has been helping with the crisis as well. Officials from their Flint division will announce how their research into the health emergency is coming along. The school has been studying the crisis through its College of Human Medicine's Division of Public Health and has recruited four public health researchers to help out.
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Watch: MSU college live streams announcement of updates to Flint public health initiative

State News | February 17
Tune in live at 4:15 p.m. Wednesday, where Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha will take part in a live stream to provide updates on the joint MSU College of Human Medicine and Hurley Medical Center public health initiative she launched after releasing data in September 2015 showing elevated blood lead levels in Flint's children.
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Meet the woman building the "model public health program" in Flint, Michigan

Elle | February 16
Many are calling Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha a hero—but the pediatrician, professor, and whistleblower behind the water crisis insists she's only doing her job.
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Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha is a hero. Here's why
KevinMD.com | February 16
Dr. Hanna-Attisha is a pediatrician in Flint, Michigan. She grew up in a suburb of Detroit. She graduated from the University of Michigan before attending medical school at Michigan State University. During her clinical years (the 3rd and 4th years of medical school), she spent many months at Hurley Medical Center in Flint, which serves as a clinical training site for MSU medical students (far from the flagship campus — something I can relate to).
READ MORE | Related: MyInforms

Mona Hanna-Attisha, MD: Flint's Voice of the Voiceless

MedPage Today | February 15
Mona Hanna-Attisha, MD, the pediatrician who first discovered the lead-laced water in Flint, Mich., is having a surreal year. "I come home every day and my husband asks 'What happened today' and I'm like 'I just met with the head of the HHS and the head of the CDC and I just did a press conference with our U.S. Senator and we introduced new legislation, and next week, I'm going to D.C. to testify in front of Congress," she told MedPage Today. "It's just surreal -- if I show you my schedule, it's unbelievable."
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Medical mobile unit will help aid Flint children exposed to lead in water

MLive | February 12
A mobile medical clinic unit has been deployed to Flint to help bring medical care to Flint children who may have been exposed to lead from Flint's water. There are no details on what areas will be first priority yet but Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, director of Hurley's pediatric residency program and an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics & Human Development at Michigan State University's College of Human Medicine, said it is much needed in the community.
READ MORE | Related: Bloomberg

Amid politics, pediatrician stands out as trusted advocate in Flint water crisis

American Journal of Pediatrics | February 12
As blame, debate and federal investigations continue into the water crisis in Flint, Mich., Mona Hanna-Attisha, M.D., M.P.H., FAAP, remains focused on the care of the city’s children. The pediatrician who proved Flint’s water system was contaminated with lead was named director of the Pediatric Public Health Initiative (PPHI) at Michigan State University (MSU) and Hurley Children’s Hospital. 
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Possible lead exposure-miscarriage link probed in Flint water crisis

MLive | February 11
The pediatrician who exposed rising blood lead levels in young children in Flint and the state of Michigan are separately investigating whether pregnant women who drank the city's tainted water had abnormally high miscarriage rates. Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, of Flint's Hurley Medical Center, and the state Department of Health and Human Services confirmed their work is already underway, but each said it is premature to draw any conclusions.
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Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha goes from doctor to global hero

Detroit Free Press | February 6
Dr. Mona has melded her calling as a doctor (complete with an hour-long commute from Oakland County to Flint) with her new role as spokeswoman for a tragedy. She still heads Hurley Medical Center’s pediatric residents program and is a professor of pediatrics and human development  at Michigan State University’s Flint-based College of Human Medicine.
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A long friendship put spotlight on Flint water crisis

Detroit Free Press | February 6
Mona Hanna finished her studies at the University of Michigan, then went to medical school at Michigan State University. She married a fellow pediatrician, had two daughters and built a career in Flint.
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Flint pediatrician at center of water crisis: 'You have to use your voice'

MLive | February 3
Hanna-Attisha took her first environmental health classes at Michigan as an undergraduate and studied public health policy as a master's student in U-M's public health school. She said the training she received at the university—and as a medical student at Michigan State—prepared her to handle the crisis in Flint.
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Sen. Peters introduces legislation to help Flint kids

UPMatters.com | February 1
“In order to help Flint children who are at risk for developmental delays from lead-leached water, we must support and expand Head Start programming to intervene early and minimize any long-term damage,” said Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, Director of Pediatric Resident Education, Hurley Medical Center and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. “Head Start can provide a critical lifeline to children in Flint, who will need specialized care and services for years to come. I thank Senator Peters, Senator Stabenow and Congressman Kildee for their leadership and commitment to helping our community overcome the impacts of lead exposure.”
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Doctor says parents can help Flint kids exposed to lead

Detroit Free Press | January 31
It wasn't until after Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, a pediatrician at Hurley Medical Center and assistant professor at Michigan State University, sounded the alarm about lead poisoning in Flint children that local officials warned residents to stop drinking the water on Oct. 1, 2015. Parents in Flint are concerned, says Hanna-Attisha, also known as Dr. Mona. Here, she answers questions about what Flint children face now and in the future and the steps their parents can take to protect them.
READ MORE | Related: Detroit Free Press (Online)

Flint weights scope of harm to children caused by lead in water

New York Times | January 30
Local philanthropic groups have set up a charitable fund with the goal of improving health outcomes for children exposed to lead, including through Dr. Hanna-Attisha’s project, the Pediatric Public Health Initiative. Psychologists, nutritionists and child development experts are among the participants in the project, which Hurley is overseeing with Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine, where Dr. Hanna-Attisha is an assistant professor of pediatrics.
READ MORE | Related: New York Times (Online)Honolulu Star AdvertiserDallas Morning NewsOregon Bulletin

How cases like Flint destroy public trust in science

Washington Post | January 27
Independent researchers, not affiliated with the government, would be a good resource, he said –“having someone from the outside review these claims and pressure and examine them dispassionately.” On that line of thought, Aron Sousa, interim dean of the College of Human Medicine at Michigan State University, wrote a recent opinion piece in Newsweek addressing the importance of public universities in cases like Flint.
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'My biggest concern is there are still children drinking this water,' says mom who helped expose the lead crisis in Flint

People | January 27
Going forward, Dr. Hanna-Attisha's mission is to help the people in Flint who will have irreversible damage from lead poisoning. She launched the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, which is an effort by Michigan State University, Hurley Children's Hospital and the Genessee County Health Department. 
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MSU pediatrician named to committee responding to Flint water crisis

MSU Today | January 27
Mona Hanna-Attisha, assistant professor of pediatrics in the College of Human Medicine and director of the pediatric residency program at Hurley Medical Center, has been named a member of Gov. Rick Snyder’s Flint Water Interagency Coordinating Committee. The committee will set in place long-term solutions to Flint’s water system. Other appointments include: Mark Valacak, health officer of the Genesee County Health Department and an instructor at the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine.
READ MORE | Related: Michigan.govCrain's Detroit BusinessWDIV TVWILX TVFox 17Fox 47MSU Today Letter from the Editor    

Snyder to seek aid for Flint children exposed to lead

Detroit Free Press | January 26
"Everything has gone for infrastructure and water," Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, head of the pediatric residents program at the city-owned Hurley Medical Center and pediatrics and human development professor at the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, said in a conference call Tuesday afternoon. "Those are Band-Aids. Those are today problems."
READ MORE | Related: USA Today

The Flint water scandal: The role of public universities

Newsweek, Opinion by Aron Sousa | January 26
The tragic events in Flint, Michigan, over the past 18 months have played out in homes, hospitals and halls of power. But it would be a serious mistake to overlook the role of universities in preserving the public welfare in the city.
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Hurley pediatric researcher got approval for Flint lead research study in 2 days

Crain's Detroit Business | January 25
It took only two days for the institutional review board at Hurley Medical Center, a city-owned hospital in Flint, to approve the research plan presented by Mona Hanna-Attisha, a Hurley pediatrician, to test children she thought might be exposed to lead poisoning through Flint’s water supply. "What we did in that short period of time could only have happened at an institution like Hurley," said Hanna-Attisha, who is also anassociate professor at College of Human Medicine at Michigan State University. "We are very lean."
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Pediatric Public Health Initiative

KCBS FM | January 25
Dean Sousa speaks with KCBS Radio in San Francisco about the Pediatric Public Health Initiative and interventions for Flint children exposed to lead. 
LISTEN

Lead poisoning and impact on children on tap for Flint talk

MLive | January 25
Dr. Hanna-Attisha is leading a collaboration between Hurley Medical Center, Michigan State University's College of Human Medicine and other community organizations in the fight to combat the effects of lead exposure in children and other Flint residents who drank or cooked with the tainted water.
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This is why the water in one Michigan city is poisoned

Teen Vogue | January 25
Six months later, outside experts concluded the water was lead poisoned. “When [my team and I] saw that it was getting into children and when we knew the consequences, that’s when I think we began not to sleep,” Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, associate professor in pediatrics at Michigan State University, told CNN in September.
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Once-discounted Flint physician heads lead poisoning response

RX List | January 25
"If we don't do something now to build this model public health program, we will see lifelong consequences," Dr Hanna-Attisha told Medscape Medical News. The initiative represents a collaboration between the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, where Dr Hanna-Attisha teaches, and Hurley Medical Center in Flint, where she directs a pediatric residency program. Other participants include the state and local health departments.
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Flint, Michigan: A century of environmental injustice

American Journal of Public Health: February 2016, Vol. 106, No. 2, pp. 200-201
But, reading the article on childhood lead poisoning by Hanna-Attisha et al.4 in this issue of AJPH reminded me that GM not only tried to defeat its workers but also the environment in which they, and all of us, live. The latter never had chance to organize and resist.
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Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Children Associated With the Flint Drinking Water Crisis: A Spatial Analysis of Risk and Public Health Response

American Journal of Public Health: February 2016, Vol. 106, No. 2: 283–290.
Mona Hanna-Attisha and Allison Champney Schnepp are with Hurley Children’s Hospital/Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and Human Development, Flint, MI. Jenny LaChance is with Hurley Medical Center Research, Flint. Richard Casey Sadler is with Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Division of Public Health, Flint.
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Health care community helps Flint respond to emergency

Crain's Detroit Business | January 24
But in late September, Mona Hanna-Attisha, a pediatrician at Hurley Medical Center, a city-owned hospital in Flint, announced tests she conducted showed up to 9,000 children in Flint were being exposed to double and even triple the average blood lead levels from the water. A doctor-to-doctor conversation with Eden Wells, M.D., the chief medical executive with theMichigan Department of Health and Human Services, was the game changer that turned around the state's attitude, said Hanna-Attisha, who now is lead with the Michigan State University/Hurley Pediatric Public Health Initiative.
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Flint residents and the struggle for clean water

NBC News | January 23
Dr. Aron Sousa, Interim Dean of the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, has similar concerns. He leads a team through the Michigan State University-Hurley Pediatric Public Health Initiative, more than 20 expert working to allay results of lead exposure in Flint ranging from water testing, environmental studies to securing public health infrastructure and nutrition education.
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Flint doctor heads effort to mitigate kids' lead exposure

Modern Healthcare | January 23
Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha will lead a partnership between Flint, Mich.-based Hurley Medical Center and Michigan State University's College of Human Medicine tasked with researching and taking action to treat and mitigate the exposure of Flint's children to high levels of lead in the city's water supply. She is director of the pediatric residency program at Hurley and also an assistant professor of pediatrics at MSU.
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Pediatrician works to mitigate effects of lead exposure on Flint's children

Washington Post | January 23
Hanna-Attisha, who also is an assistant professor of pediatrics at Michigan State University, is leading a committee of experts to develop a strategy that would mitigate the impact of lead exposure on thousands of children under age 6.
READ MORE | Related: Star Tribune

Michigan universities move to research Flint water crisis

Detroit News | January 23
Michigan State: The university’s College of Human Medicine announced a partnership with Hurley Children’s Hospital for a Pediatric Public Health Initiative aimed at addressing the lead exposure in Flint by providing assessment, research and monitoring, and interventions.
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MSU experts address Flint water crisis

MSUToday | January 22
“The creation of this Pediatric Public Health Initiative will give Flint children a better chance at future success,” Hanna-Attisha said. “This initiative will bring in a team of experts to build a model pediatric public health program which will continue to assess, monitor and intervene to optimize children’s outcomes.” Dean Sienko, associate dean for prevention and public health in MSU's College of Human Medicine, is also involved in the initiative.
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How a stubborn pediatrician forced the state to take Flint's water crisis seriously

Huffington Post | January 21
The Michigan State University College of Human Medicine has launched an initiative to treat nearly 27,000 Flint children exposed to lead in the city’s water, the Detroit News reported. The effort will be led by -- you guessed it -- Hanna-Attisha.
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This pediatrician is working to save 9,000 young lives in Flint

Washington Post | January 21
“We cannot sit back and wait 20 years to see the consequences of lead poisoning in our schools and in our criminal justice system,” said Mona Hanna-Attisha, director of pediatric residency at Hurley Children’s Hospital, who in September led a group of doctors urging Flint to stop drawing tap water from the Flint River after finding elevated lead levels in the blood of young children. Hanna-Attisha, 39, who also is an assistant professor of pediatrics at Michigan State University, is leading a committee of experts to develop a strategy that would mitigate the impact of lead exposure on thousands of children under age 6.
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Dr. Hanna-Attisha on leading Public Health Initiative in Flint

WDET Radio | January 21
The newly-launched Pediatric Public Health Initiative is an effort by Michigan State University, Hurley Children’s Hospital and the Genessee County Health Department. The project’s leader is Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, who tells WDET’s Annamarie Sysling about the trajectory of her work, as she tries to restore hope among the residents of Flint.
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MSU, Hurley hospital partner on mitigating lead exposure in Flint

WKAR Radio | January 19
Current State talks about the Pediatric Public Health Initiative with Hurley pediatrician Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha and Associate Dean at the MSU College of Human Medicine Dr. Dean Sienko.
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Initiative to treat children exposed to toxic lead in Flint's water

CNN | January 19
I want to talk more about the health crisis with Dr. Dean Sienko, of Michigan State University. He's spearheaded an initiative to treat the estimated 27,000 children exposed to the toxic lead in Flint's water. "What we're focusing on now is, what can we do to help the children. We're looking at helping them through education. There's been talk about universal pre-K, talk about universal Head Start. We're trying to improve their nutrition so that they know of food nutrition they can do that will mitigate the effects of the lead exposure, and as well as health care, so that if we identify these children early on, we can get them into appropriate care."
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Flint Water Crisis: What's being done to help children exposed to lead

ABC News | January 19
As the water crisis continues, health experts said they are working to mitigate the long-term effects of lead exposure in the youngest residents, even if they can't reverse it. Hanna-Attisha along with others at the Hurley Medical Center are working with Michigan State University and the Genesee County Health Department as part of the Pediatric Public Health Initiative, announced last week. The initiative includes cooking classes and an information pamphlet from MSU aimed at helping parents give their children food that will protect them from lead exposure. That's because a diet rich in iron, calcium and vitamin C "can decrease absorption and increase excretion," of lead, said Dr. Dean Sienko, associate dean of prevention and public health at MSU's College of Human Medicine.
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Gov. Rick Snyder to present plan of action on Flint's water crisis

NewsOne Now | January 19
Dr. Dean Sienko from the MSU College of Human Medicine explained on NewsOne Now a team of experts is being assembled to monitor the children of Flint for the foreseeable future as a result of the Flint water crisis. Watch Dr. Sienko and Roland Martin’s NewsOne Now discussion below.
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New initiative to help Flint children with lead poisoning

WILX TV 10 | January 18|
Michigan State University and Hurley Children's Hospital are teaming up to help children in Flint who have been exposed to lead in their water. The Pediatric Public Health Initiative will be headed by Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, the Flint pediatrician who discovered high lead levels in children after the city switched to the Flint River as its water source in 2014.
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Latest: Michigan's Snyder asks Obama to declare emergency

New York Times | January 15
Michigan State University and a Flint hospital are putting a team together to keep a long-term eye on Flint's lead problem, from offering nutrition tips to residents to health monitoring. The effort will be led by Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, who is credited with sounding the alarm last year about high levels of lead in children.
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New Pediatric Public Health Initiative to support the health of Flint children

MSU Today | January 14
Michigan State University and Hurley Children’s Hospital have announced a new Pediatric Public Health Initiative to address the Flint community’s population-wide lead exposure and help all Flint children grow up healthy and strong. The Pediatric Public Health Initiative brings together experts in pediatrics, child development, psychology, epidemiology, nutrition, toxicology, geography and education, and includes the Genesee County Health Department, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services and MSU Extension.
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Elevated blood lead levels associated with Flint drinking water crisis in published report

Grand Blanc View | January 7
The latest research has been published by the American Journal of Public Health citing elevated blood lead levels in children associated with the Flint drinking water crisis. The research was conducted by Mona Hanna-Attisha MD MPH FAAP, Director, Pediatric Residency Program at Hurley Children’s Hospital and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Jenny LaChance, MS, Hurley Research Center, Richard Sadler PhD, MSU College of Human Medicine Division of Public Health and Allison Champney Schnepp, MD, Pediatric Resident at Hurley Children’s Hospital/Michigan State University.
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