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In the News

2019 William J. Beal Outstanding Faculty Awards
MSUToday | January 28
Susan Barman, PhD, professor, Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, is a recipient of MSU's 2019 William J. Beal Outstanding Faculty Award. Barman is a committed instructor in the College of Human Medicine, teaching physiology and pharmacology concepts throughout the curriculum and serving as a problem-based learning facilitator. Read more about her accomplishments.

Zombie cells could be key to Alzheimer's susceptibility
MSUToday | January 25
The National Institute on Aging has awarded a Michigan State University College of Human Medicine professor a nearly $3 million grant to study how aging increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and to investigate treatments that could delay or prevent it.

Change Ups: Education
Grand Rapids Business Journal | January 25
Jerry Kooiman, a longtime Michigan State University College of Human Medicine assistant dean, was promoted to chief external relations officer. His additional responsibilities include overseeing the college’s relationships with health systems and other external partners. Kooiman also provides strategy, vision and leadership for key relationships with hospital partners, industry partners, and government and community leaders. He also ensures alignment with external efforts including communications and marketing, community engagement and outreach, development and government relations efforts.

Schizophrenia patients more willing to manage symptoms using smartphones
MSUToday | January 23
Eric Achtyes, a Michigan State University College of Human Medicine psychiatrist has found that most patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder are willing to use a smartphone application to help manage their symptoms, including after regular clinic hours.

When healers hurt
Proto Magazine | January 22
“Violence occurs throughout the hospital,” says Judith Arnetz, a professor and associate chair for research in the Department of Family Medicine at Michigan State University in Grand Rapids, who studies the topic. Nurses, nursing aides and behavioral health staff members suffer the highest rates of abuse and violence, she says, and physicians, particularly in the emergency room, are also at high risk.

Flint Registry officially goes live
MSUToday | January 17
Flint residents now can officially take full advantage of the Flint Registry, an effort to connect residents to programs and other resources that serve to minimize the effects of lead on their health, while promoting wellness and recovery. After a year of development and pre-enrollment, the registry already has 6,000 people signed up.
Related: FlintsideFOX66WDIVABC 12WNEMNBC25 NewsMLiveEast Village Magazine, WILX

High pesticide exposure among farmers linked to poor sense of smell later
MSUToday | January 16
A Michigan State University study by Honglei Chen, professor of epidemiology, is the first to show an association between unusually high pesticide exposure and poor sense of smell among aging farmers. The research examined more than 11,200 farmers over a 20-year period. At the start of the study, about 16 percent of participants reported having experienced a high pesticide exposure event, or HPEE, such as a large amount of pesticide spilling on their body. Two decades later, they were asked if they suffered olfactory impairment, a partial to complete loss of sense of smell.

Gene therapy could eliminate drug side effect in Parkinson's patients
MSUToday | January 11
Kathy Steece-Collier, a Michigan State University researcher, has received a $2.8 million federal grant to develop a gene therapy that could reduce and possibly eliminate a frustrating side effect of a drug commonly prescribed to Parkinson’s patients. The research could mean a significant advance for the up to 90 percent of patients who develop dyskinesia, a drug-induced side effect that results in the involuntary and uncontrolled movement of hands, head and other body parts.

In Flint, a future built on schools as well as safe water
Christian Science Monitor | January 10
Thanks to funding from the state and the federal Centers for Disease Control, Michigan State’s Division of Public Health launched FlintRegistry.org in January. The registry is modeled partly after a similar effort supporting families affected by the World Trade Center attacks in 2001. It aims to connect current and even former Flint residents who were affected by the water crisis to more than 30 services and resources, including those for early education.

If you want to live longer, volunteer more
Considerable | January 9
Older adults who volunteer report less depression, greater life satisfaction, and more happiness than non-volunteers,” says Dr. Rodlescia Sneed, an assistant professor of public health at Michigan State University, College of Human Medicine-Flint.

How to find reliable health information online
SEEN | January 4
Not sure if you can trust what you’re reading online? SciMoms co-founder Alison Bernstein shares a few tips for evaluating articles about your health.